Tuesday, July 22, 2014 Tammuz 24, 5774
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It's always an adventure to open a book dealing with someone of supreme talent about whom you know little or -- better still -- nothing at all. Each time you do so, it makes you acutely aware of how many noteworthy writers and artists have fallen through the cracks during every period of history. And when you consider women artists...
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There were a number of reasons why I purchased In Balanchine's Company -- mostly because I enjoy reading memoirs written by dancers of all stripes, especially those who were pioneers in famous companies and appeared in the premieres of classic ballets. But the true selling point in this case was that the book, a memoir by Barbara Milberg Fisher, published...
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When I was growing up back in the late 1950s and '60s, modernism -- and not the ubiquitous post-modernism that was spawned by the excesses and political shenanigans of the 1960s -- was the foundation of the temple where we literary types worshipped. And at the center of that temple stood Gertrude Stein, doyenne of a Paris salon that included...
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Coming amid the intense worldwide focus on the 40th anniversary of the Six-Day War, which has also proven to be a time of renewed friction between the United States and Russia, an Israeli husband-and-wife research team has offered up a theory contending that it was the Soviet Union -- and not the Arabs or Israelis -- who engineered the 1967...
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How an anticipated work fails to meet expectations
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There is nothing more disappointing for a critic than to look forward with anticipation to reading a book -- especially one with an intriguing concept by an admired writer -- only to find that it falls far short of expectations. Such has been the case with Room for Doubt by Wendy Lesser, founder and editor of the adventurous, California-based literary...
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