Israel Briefs: El Al Flight Attendant Dies From Measles and More

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an el al airplane flies through air
An El Al airplane (Mark Harkin via Wikimedia Commons)

El Al Flight Attendant Dies From Measles

An El Al flight attendant who contracted measles several months ago on a flight from New York has died, JTA reported.

Rotem Amitai, 43, died at an Israeli hospital on Aug. 13. The mother of three contracted the disease in late March after a sick passenger boarded a flight; she was hospitalized and placed into an induced coma, The Jerusalem Post reported at the time. She had been on a respirator and had reportedly suffered brain damage.

The Times of Israel reported that Amtai had only received one measles vaccine shot instead of the recommended two.

The Health Ministry in Israel ordered local airlines to inoculate their staff in late April, prompting more than 250 El Al crew members to be vaccinated.

Israel Deports Guest Worker and Israel-Born Son

A raid by Israel’s Population and Immigration Authority on Aug. 12 resulted in the deportation of a guest worker from the Philippines and her 12-year-old Israeli-born son, JTA reported.

Rosemarie and Rohan Perez were living a Tel Aviv apartment when the raid was conducted.

“They just tossed us around,” Rohan told Ynet. “They took us to the airport with nothing. We asked to make a phone call, but they wouldn’t let us. I told them that I wanted to stay here and that we have done nothing wrong.”

The Times of Israel reported that the Israeli government plans to deport about 50 children of foreign workers who are in the country illegally by overstaying their work visas.

Immigration Authority spokeswoman Sabine Hadad said Rosemarie Perez had been in the country illegally for 10 years. There are 25,000 to 30,000 Filipino workers in the country; they often work as aides to the elderly.

Poorest and Richest Neighborhoods in Israel Ranked; Tel Aviv Home to Many of the Latter

Tel Aviv has most of the richest neighborhoods in Israel, while Jerusalem contains nearly half of the poorest, according to figures from the Central Bureau of Statistics, Globes reported.

The Israeli neighborhood with the highest socioeconomic rating is Park Tzameret in Tel Aviv, followed by Tzahala in Tel Aviv, and Denia in Haifa. About 510,000 people live in Israel’s wealthiest neighborhoods.

On the other end of the spectrum are the Ramat Elchanan neighborhood in Bnei Brak, Kiryat HaRama and Ramat HaTana’im in Beit Shemesh, and Mea She’arim in Jerusalem. There are 658,000 people living in Israel’s poorest neighborhoods, including 358,000 in Jerusalem.

The socioeconomic ratings were measured via a combination of demographic mix, education and higher education, standard of living, employment and pensioners.

Israeli Software Company Wins 10-Year FAA Contract to Speed Up Incident Reports

Ra’anana-based software firm NICE won a 10-year $137 million contract with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to enhance airline response and investigations, JNS.org reported.

NICE will provide the FAA Air Traffic Organization with software that speeds up incident responses and improves visibility into incident data at more than 770 sites.

The software covers voice, radar, CCTV video and other data. It also will record multimedia communications and other information from air traffic systems; that enables the data to be both quarantined and shared.

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Andy Gotlieb is the managing editor of the Jewish Exponent. He holds 31 years of experience in communications, mostly in journalism, with a decade in public relations, too. Prior newspaper stops include the St. Joseph (Mo.) News-Press, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, the Tampa Tribune and the Philadelphia Business Journal. The first 17 years were spent in print journalism, where I covered, at various times, business, politics, crime and government, among other beats. The final 2.5 years in that stretch was an editor at the Philadelphia Business Journal, where my responsibilities included complete control over a weekly section and working with both staff writers and freelancers. In late 2005, I switched gears and began working in public relations for the next decade. I learned the ins and outs of public relations -- including being on the other side of the media-PR equation -- and made numerous contacts. I rejoined the ranks of journalism in March 2016, starting as the managing editor of the Jewish Exponent.

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