Talking Shop and Health at Summit

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On Nov. 12, the Philadelphia-Israel Chamber of Commerce with mHealth Israel, Drexel University, Greenberg Traurig LLP and University Science Center, held its second annual Israeli Digital Health Summit at Drexel University.

On Nov. 12, the Philadelphia-Israel Chamber of Commerce with mHealth Israel, Drexel University, Greenberg Traurig LLP and University Science Center, held its second annual Israeli Digital Health Summit at Drexel University.
 
“Hospitals are trying to simplify services, help you stay healthy, help you get on track with your medicine and help you care for yourself so you will be less likely to get to the hospital in bad shape,” said Vered Nohi, executive director of the Philadelphia-Israel Chamber of Commerce, who organized the summit. 
 
PICC facilitates connections between Israeli and Philadelphia, Southern New Jersey and Delaware based businesses, governmental agencies and economic development organizations. It also represents the US-Israel Binational Industrial R&D (BIRD) Foundation and BIRD Energy, which annually awards 20 to 30 grants up to $1 million to U.S.-Israeli company technology ventures.
 
“Israel is a powerhouse in digital health,” Nohi told the Jewish Exponent.
 
On display at the conference were new Israeli ideas and software, from tools to better manage cancer, diabetes and neuroscience care, to applications that address patient communications and electronic medical records that will help improve medication compliance and management.
 
Some of the attendees included Drexel University, Thomas Jefferson University, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania, A.I. DuPont Nemours Children’s Hospital, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, GlaxoSmithKline and Independence Blue Cross.
 
Nohi said the purpose of the conference was to allow health care startups from Israel to expand, network and partner with companies in the tri-state region. 
 
“There is a goal to improve the health care system and reduce the cost,” she said. “The local and Israeli companies made valuable connections.”
 
Fernando Salles, vice president and head of global search at Teva, told the attendees the Israeli company is always aiming to make patients feel better. 
 
“Health care is something people have to work together to be successful,” Salles said.  
 
TeleMessage, which is based in Petach Tikva, Israel, and was founded in 1999 by Guy Levit, provides secure mobile applications with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant messages for health care providers. 
 
Levit described it as WhatsApp for healthcare. With TeleMessage, doctors are able to send patient information via cell phone and consult with other physicians. Levit was hopeful to expand his product to the Philadelphia area.     
 
“Digital health is a very broad spectrum, and TeleMessage actually has products which don’t only work in the digital health arena,” he said. “We are a very robust messaging platform, which not only gives solutions to healthcare and hospitals, but we also give solutions to many other industries.” 
 
Megan Snyder, a business development analyst at Independence Blue Cross in Philadelphia, which already invests in startup health care companies, said the conference was a perfect opportunity to meet people with similar interests.   
 
“There’s a lot of overuse of hospitals where a patient could get support if they just need information or just need to see a primary care physician, but they don’t have a primary care physician,” Snyder said. “So, they just go to the hospital. A lot of the digital health care solutions provide support mechanisms to patients to get the care advice for what they need.” 
 
Contact: jcohen@jewishexponent.com; 215-832-0747 

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