Friday, July 11, 2014 Tammuz 13, 5774

Robert Leiter

Former Senior Editor
By:
Sometimes, you just have to lean back and revel in how certain writers can so dexterously put words together. I find that the awe their powers elicit is even more astonishing when they approach subjects that don't innately interest me. I've long been a fan of Natalie Angier, who writes on science for The New York Times. I think she's...
Comment0
By:
It was Gen. Douglas MacArthur who supposedly said, "Old soldiers never die; they simply fade away." I began wondering recently if there were some commensurate phrase that might sum up the fate of old editors, since in the case of at least one, he's refusing, rather insistently, to fade away. These notions popped up while I was perusing Lapham's Quarterly,...
Comment0
A poet creates a sound -- a vision, really -- of his own making
By:
Louis Zukofsky has been called the most influential poet you've never heard of. Much like his fellow Objectivist, Charles Reznikoff, whom I wrote about several weeks ago, he toiled in almost complete obscurity, unknown to readers and critics alike, though during his lifetime, he and his work were beloved by many other poets. These days, however, he's been getting some...
Comment0
By:
It's quite remarkable how a single book can take a writer's career and transform it, giving it a whole new tenor that somewhat obscures, if not obliterates, much of what came before. Take John Updike's novel Couples, for example. Literary gossip has it that at a party one night the late Norman Mailer, in his inimitable cheery manner, cornered Updike...
Comment0
A poet seems simple, but his depth is undeniable
By:
Charles Reznikoff's poetry has a mystery about it unlike anyone else's. He was, determinedly, a Modernist, but if you were to compare him to T.S. Eliot or Ezra Pound -- two of the undisputed Modernist masters, at least of the American canon -- his language and imagery would seem simple, uncluttered, clear-cut, not in the least obfuscatory. He is not...
Comment0

Profile

Robert Leiter served as senior editor of the Jewish Exponent before retiring in Dec. 2013. 

In his 30 years with the paper, he won many awards and held many positions, from full-time reporter to interim editor. For five years in the early 1980s, he was managing editor of Inside magazine, the Exponent's sister publication, and for seven years in the 2000s, he was the quarterly's editor in chief, while still working full time for the paper.

Since the mid-1980s, he reported from most of the major capitals of Europe for the Exponent, with an emphasis on the Eastern Bloc countries, during and after Communist rule. Throughout this period, he visited Poland, the two Germanies and the Soviet Union with greatest frequency, but also made visits to Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. He has also reported from Catalonia, Alsace, Zurich and Venice, as well as from Costa Rica, Norway, India and the Middle East. A number of his journalism awards have been for his reporting from Europe.

He is a contributing editor to The American Poetry Review, which is based in Philadelphia, and in the 1980s, he served as Murray Friedman's assistant to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Washington, D.C.

He has also been a freelance writer for 40 years and his book reviews, short stories, essays, interviews and profiles have appeared in The Nation, The New Republic, CommonwealDissent, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The New Leader, The Forward, Moment, Redbook, The Pennsylvania GazetteThe Philadelphia BulletinThe Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Partisan Review and many other mainstream local and national publications.

Contact

215-832-0726

Subscribe To our E-Newsletter

Subscribe to Jewish Exponent Email List

Our Supporters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Advertisement