Thursday, July 10, 2014 Tammuz 12, 5774

But are hormone injections being used for what they were originally intended?
By:
Diana Aydin, Jewish Exponent Feature
Human growth hormone injections have recently received attention for their seemingly magical benefits, including the power to fight aging or to build up muscles. But don't be deceived by the bulging biceps of bodybuilders or football stars -- the secret behind their Hulk-like physiques isn't necessarily human growth hormone, according to Alan Rogol, professor of clinical pediatrics, Riley Hospital Indiana...
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An Elkins Park woman battles back against a disease that simply takes your breath away
By:
Michelle Mostovy-Eisenberg
Imagine getting short of breath doing the simplest of daily activities: walking up the stairs, going grocery shopping, carrying the laundry basket or lifting your young daughter into the air. For Alanna Nelson, a Jewish woman from Elkins Park, this is her daily life, ever since she was diagnosed in 2007 with a rare -- and often fatal -- lung...
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By:
Jared Shelly
Tom Kleinman couldn't help himself. After just a year of hosting the women's professional softball team -- the Philadelphia Force -- at his quaint ballpark in Allentown, Pa., the team was ready to fold. Owner Bill Thompson was facing health problems and needed to sell the team to keep it afloat. Kleinman -- who has worn hats as diverse as...
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By:
Aaron Passman
A $100,000 grant means more than just a name change for the Temple Association of Retired Persons. The Temple University lifelong learning organization was recently awarded a grant from the Bernard Osher Foundation, a San Francisco entity named for a Jewish resident of that city and dedicated to the preservation of lifelong learning programs. In 2006, Forbes ranked Osher, a...
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By:
Jared Shelly
Athletes from Lebron James to Donavan McNabb have described the "moment" they knew -- that time, often at young age, when they realized they possessed the athletic gifts that could carry them to the professional ranks. Dan Arnstein knew he wasn't one of those kids. "I'm a really, really awful athlete," said Arnstein, a 20-year-old junior at Haverford College. "I...
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