Sunday, March 1, 2015 AdarI 10, 5775
By:
Lori Samlin Miller Jewish Exponent Feature
At a recent conference on "Our Heritage and Our Health: The Importance of Being Informed/Understanding Jewish Genetic Diseases," Gary Frohlich, a leading New York trained and now California-based genetic counselor, opened by pronouncing that genetic diseases don't discriminate. "Ashkenazi Jewish genetic diseases are not sex limited; that is, males and females are affected equally. When speaking about genetic diseases, we're...
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By:
Elyse Glickman, Jewish Exponent Feature
Among the various childhood rites of passages, many of us will recall a bout of measles as one of them. From a kid's perspective way back when, it did have a plus side -- staying home from school, eating chicken soup and watching cartoons. But the illness is no trivial matter. Recent reports have shown a resurgence nationally of measles,...
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By:
Diane McManus
Not long ago, macular degeneration, a disease of the retina, meant certain blindness. But scientists are working on an implantable artificial retina that can, with a simple surgical procedure, restore eyesight. Other implantable devices are being developed to monitor glucose, treat heart failure and relieve pain. Indeed, overweight patients could one day swallow an ingestible hydrogel capsule that induces satiety...
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To be a working mom or a stay-at-homer? That is the question
By:
Elyse Glickman, Jewish Exponent Feature
Just in time for Mother's Day comes a revived battle of choices for women dealing with circumstances that can dictate their own physical and emotional health: The oft-discussed "War on Women" has brought back the old "working mom" vs. "stay at home" controversy and which is healthier for families overall. Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen was fired up about, and later,...
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By:
Lynne Blumberg, Jewish Exponent Feature
Ira Bergman, 59, was asked if he wanted to see a rabbi when he entered a hospice program in September 2008. He had been fighting colon cancer for more than four years when his care began at the Wissahickon Hospice and Palliative Home Care of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His wife, Rhona, said that Ira had been...
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