Wednesday, May 4, 2016 Nisan 26, 5776
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Even if a 20-something pro­fessional attends the High Holiday Wine Tasting event, has a few drinks, acquires tickets for Rosh Ha­sha­nah, attends services -- but then doesn't join any congregation, the event is not a waste of time for a synagogue, said Michael Meketon of Congregation Levy Ha-Ir. "At that age, I didn't really care about affiliation," said Meketon, 48,...
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Eileen Goltz, Jewish Exponent Feature
Oh joy! It’s that time of year when we get to eat honey cake (yes, this is sarcasm). Okay, before you get your yontif nose out of joint, I will freely admit that I’m among the minority of the tribe that really never cared for this quintessential holiday treat. It’s probably not my favorite because my mom didn’t care for...
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Jamie Geller, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
So this is where it all comes together — all the thought, all the planning, the testing. And the tasting, of course — always the best part. In the coming year, may all of your meals be cooked to perfection — may nothing burn, nothing get soggy or fall apart. May it be a year of culinary delights and taste-bud...
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And just the right flavor at Rosh Hashanah time
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Ethel G.Hofman
Rosh Hashanah is one of my favorite holidays. It means sweet desserts galore, when even the savory dishes, such as stuffed cabbage, are infused with a sweet-tart flavor. Sweetness is a symbol of hope that the coming year will be filled with happiness and fulfillment. For Ashkenazi Jews, the first foods eaten on Rosh Hashanah are apple wedges dip­ped in...
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When students come to Hillel of Greater Philadelphia seeking advice on how to handle a conflict between class and observing the High Holidays, Rabbi Howard Alpert said he advises them on how to discuss the issue with their professors, but he himself avoids intervening. His reasoning is that when a student has to explain such an absence to faculty it...
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