Saturday, August 1, 2015 Av 16, 5775
By:
Rivka Tal, Jewish Exponent Feature
Let's face it, sometimes Passover food can get monotonous -- how many potatoes can one person eat? So when the family tires of chicken and potatoes or roast and potatoes, why not try using whole matzah as a raw material? There are matzah kugels and matzah roll-ups. Sephardi Jews often dampen matzah before eating it; then it can be filled...
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By:
Eileen Goltz, Jewish Exponent Feature
SLICE OF LIFE One of the biggest problems with the week of Pesach is that so much of the food is so heavy. Eggs, oil, matzah meal and meat -- lots and lots of meat and chicken, and then maybe some more meat. Sometimes, all you want is a little bit of nothing to fill in the times between the...
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By:
Arthur Waskow and Phyllis Berman
If a pharaoh fell in the Red Sea but nobody told the story, did it actually happen? No. If no pharaoh fell in the Red Sea, but we told the story for 3,000 years, did it actually happen? Yes. Is it still happening? Yes. To people brought up in the modern mode of focusing on cold, hard facts, these responses...
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By:
Laura Goldman
When journalist Cokie Roberts, a devout Catholic, married Steve Roberts, whose secular family was fiercely protective of its cultural Jewish identity, they both agreed to respect and observe each other's religious and family traditions. It's now been 40 years that they have been celebrating seders, including what Roberts termed a cheesecake version in Greece and one with an "Egyptian guest...
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By:
Estelle Fleischer can't help but think of the Passover seder in terms of time -- a really long time, to be precise. Her childhood memories involved her stomach rumbling and her eyes glazing over as adults went on and on in incomprehensible Hebrew. "My father was a kosher butcher. We had to say every word of the seder," said Fleischer,...
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