Tuesday, July 22, 2014 Tammuz 24, 5774
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To survive the Holocaust, the Jews had to battle near-impossible conditions -- hunger, filth, disease, ceaseless work, endless brutality. The fact that many made it until liberation was often a matter of sheer luck, as countless survivors have testified over the years since the end of World War II. But if it was difficult for the majority of people, how...
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Traveling exhibit depicts Pope John Paul II's ties to the Jewish people
Twenty-one years ago, two religious leaders of different faiths met, and history was made. On April 13, 1986, Pope John Paul II was welcomed to Rome's central synagogue by Elio Toaff, the chief rabbi of Rome. It was the first time a pope had ever visited a synagogue. In a new exhibit, now on display at the Kimmel Center for...
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Whether she looks north or south from the windows of her house in the Galilee, echoes of history come alive, explained poet Rachel Tzvia Back, who also noted that she is reminded daily of all that has transpired in the hills she now calls home. The cycle of violence in the region is brought vividly to life in the poems...
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Back in the 1980s and '90s, when Rabbi Lance Sussman was researching the life of 19th-century Jewish leader Isaac Leeser, he would shuttle back and forth between institutes in Cincinnati and Philadelphia, the repositories where the bulk of Leeser's papers were stored. The rabbi kept his notes on thousands of index cards and stored his work on numerous floppy disks...
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On the streets where Benjamin Franklin walked, James and Dolly Madison once lived, and George Washington may have slept, Colonial-era Jews also made their presence -- albeit a subtle one -- known. The cobblestone streets that William Penn designed between the Delaware and Schuykill rivers welcomed Jews as merchants, religious leaders and Revolutionary War supporters -- so much so that,...
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