Wednesday, May 4, 2016 Nisan 26, 5776
By:
Linda Morel, Jewish Exponent Feature
WHAT'S COOKING? Although it sounds like a contradiction in terms, I'm a great fan of cold soups, which are even more versatile than their steaming winter counterparts. When was the last time you heard of anyone serving piping-hot soup for breakfast or dessert? Yet ice-cold soups can be anything you want them to be. I eat frosty fruit soups at...
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By:
Rivka Tal
Mention the word "goulash" and a lot of people automatically add the word, "Hungarian." Few would argue that the hearty beef stew was born in Middle Europe. The dish, as well as the word gulyás , actually hails from Hungary. Gulyá literally means "herd of cattle"; hence, gulyás means "cowherd." The meal prepared in a kettle by cowherds is called...
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By:
Keri Fisher, Jewish Exponent Feature
NOSH A ripe tomato is a thing of beauty. I've been known to eat them out of hand, garnished only with a sprinkle of salt and pepper. But when summer's bounty is a bit too bountiful, I host my own tomato festival at home, with a menu that honors this humble fruit, and recipes that highlight, rather than mask, its...
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By:
Louise Fiszer, Jewish Exponent Feature
BEYOND CHICKEN SOUP "Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did." William Butler, a 16th-century physician, shares my view on the much beloved strawberry. No wonder that strawberries grace the covers of most spring issues of food magazines, and that a number of restaurants declare a "Strawberry Week" in mid-May with special dishes on their...
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Perhaps it's the tradition of mezze -- a selection of salad appetizers without which no Middle Eastern meal could begin. Or maybe it has to do with the glorious abundance of produce in our local markets. In any case, Shabbat meals in Jerusalem always begin with at least four or five cold salads. When planning a course of salads, keep...
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