Monday, May 25, 2015 Sivan 7, 5775
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The Jewish Publication Society is tiny in comparison to publishing powerhouses like Random House and Yale University Press. Indeed, it released just eight new titles last year. That makes the fact that JPS beat out nearly every other publisher in the 2006 National Jewish Book Awards all the more remarkable. The honors, which were doled out earlier this month, named...
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When Marthe Cohn acknowledged to a sold-out audience Sunday morning that she made an "unlikely spy," she wasn't kidding. At 4 feet, 7 inches, the 86-year-old Jewish grandmother hardly looks like the James Bond-type. But during World War II, Cohn, then in her 20s, worked as an undercover agent with French intelligence. Speaking in a heavy French accent, Cohn relayed...
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Bright romance in a dark time
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"This is the saddest story I've ever heard." That's a sentence the literary-minded may recognize as the first line of Ford Maddox Ford's most famous work of fiction The Good Soldier . He meant the phrase to be taken as bitterly ironic, especially once the reader reaches the finale of the novel, then thinks back to the innocent beginnings of...
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A touch of sadness clings to The Company They Kept , an otherwise joyous collection of essays by some of the world's best writers, in which they recount "unforgettable friendships" they've been blessed with. The sadness stems from the fact that this would appear to be the last book project that Robert B. Silvers and Barbara Epstein worked on. All...
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Critic Clement Greenberg visited Syracuse often
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Clement Greenberg's name is not one that resonates these days with readers, except possibly among connoisseurs of the art world. But in the 1940s and '50s, he was one of the great cultural brokers in the United States, determining, with a word or a phrase, whose reputations rose or sank in the American art world. He commanded this power from...
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