Wednesday, June 3, 2015 Sivan 16, 5775
Not entirely, but be prepared to think these poems through
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Paul Celan, like Tadeusz Borowski and Primo Levi, was a writer and survivor who committed suicide many years after leaving the horrific universe of the Nazi death camps. Celan is not as widely known as Levi -- his work is far too fearsome in its depth and obscurity to ensure a wide readership -- though he is considered by discerning...
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One of my all-time favorite books is Lost New York , a compilation of photos, sketches and text that explain all the architectural wonders that we Americans somehow allowed people to destroy throughout the recent history of Manhattan. The long-lamented original Pennsylvania Station at 33rd Street -- one of the greatest creations of the fabled McKim, Mead and White firm...
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Michelle Mostovy-Eisenberg, JE Feature
At first glance, Jonathan Rosen's latest book, The Life of the Skies , subtitled Birding at the End of Nature , seems to be about, well, birds. But The Life of the Skies is about more than that. While exploring history, religion and culture, as found in literature spanning thousands of years, Rosen shows his readers -- and, in fact,...
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... and ours: The story of a Philadelphia street
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Bruce Buschel's first book, Walking Broad , published recently by Simon & Schuster, has an almost unbeatable premise. Not that it's so outrageously novel. Many other writers have wandered about cities -- generally along major, world-famous thoroughfares -- in search of the heart and soul of a particular urban terrain and its populace. In fact, this little trick was especially...
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The journey of a New York mayor's family
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When the book Fiorello's Sister appeared in my office, the thought flashed through my mind that, yes, Fiorello La Guardia, the beloved mayor of New York City during the 1930s and '40s, known endearingly to his supporters as the "Little Flower," had had Jewish ancestry somewhere down the line. I assumed that this point was the reason why the book...
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