Wednesday, July 8, 2015 Tammuz 21, 5775
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Publishers can be shameless when it comes to trying to capitalize on a trend or a fad; and they can be particularly shameless promoters when it comes to taking advantage of the Jewish world's deep and abiding interest in the Holocaust. In the case of two recent books -- The Diary of Petr Ginz 1941-1942 , just reissued in paper...
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Of the newer breed of New Yorker cartoonists -- those who first came of artistic age in the magazine's pages during the late 1970s and '80s -- Roz Chast has to be one of the most off-the-wall types in a very unpredictable group. It was clear in the 1970s that the magazine was attempting to break its own mold, especially...
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For those who know of Vanity Fair only in its most recent incarnation -- that is, over the last 25 years -- and are unaware of its justifiably storied past, Vanity Fair The Portraits: A Century of Iconic Images may prove to be an eye-opener on various levels. The work is built on a truly monumental scale -- it's nearly...
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Michelle Mostovy-Eisenberg, JE Feature
Amherst College professor and prolific writer Ilán Stavans' most recent book, Resurrecting Hebrew , recounts the story of how, at the end of the 19th century, Lithuanian-born lexicographer Eliezer Ben-Yehuda reinvented the Hebrew language as the "centerpiece of Zionism" -- "the living tongue" of a new, modern nation to be known as Israel. The author, 47, who teaches Latin American...
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Aaron Passman, JE Feature
The Cat in the Hat, but Di Kats der Payats ? That's the Yiddish translation by Zackary Sholem Berger who, along with his wife, Celeste Sollod, runs Yiddish House LLC. Since 2003, Yiddish House has published Yiddish translations of children's classics like The Cat in the Hat, Curious George (George der Naygeriker) and, most recently, another Dr. Seuss -- One...
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