Thursday, July 31, 2014 Av 4, 5774
An independent publisher takes a chance on the misunderstood novella
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Every so often, I've used this space to praise small independent publishers who, no matter the economic foolhardiness of their endeavors, forge ahead and never compromise their principles. I'm thinking particularly of one-person operations like Dryad Press down in Maryland and Turtle Point Press right in the thick of things in Manhattan, as well as ventures like New York Review...
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I am a sporadic sports fan -- at best -- these days, and have only ever had a real passion for college football and basketball, and never much tolerance for professional sports (the pay scale seems to me problematic, the kvetching by players is more than I can take, and then there's that whole doping thing). So when a book...
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Publishers can be shameless when it comes to trying to capitalize on a trend or a fad; and they can be particularly shameless promoters when it comes to taking advantage of the Jewish world's deep and abiding interest in the Holocaust. In the case of two recent books -- The Diary of Petr Ginz 1941-1942 , just reissued in paper...
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Of the newer breed of New Yorker cartoonists -- those who first came of artistic age in the magazine's pages during the late 1970s and '80s -- Roz Chast has to be one of the most off-the-wall types in a very unpredictable group. It was clear in the 1970s that the magazine was attempting to break its own mold, especially...
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Michelle Mostovy-Eisenberg, JE Feature
Amherst College professor and prolific writer Ilán Stavans' most recent book, Resurrecting Hebrew , recounts the story of how, at the end of the 19th century, Lithuanian-born lexicographer Eliezer Ben-Yehuda reinvented the Hebrew language as the "centerpiece of Zionism" -- "the living tongue" of a new, modern nation to be known as Israel. The author, 47, who teaches Latin American...
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