Monday, April 20, 2015 Iyyar 1, 5775
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Yosef Mendelevich's memoir Unbroken Spirit, which tells of his life and times as a refusenik in the Soviet Union, begins with a bang, both stylistically and quite literally. Back in 1969, the 22-year-old Latvian-born Mendelevich and a number of other young Jews were involved in a daring plot to hijack a Soviet plane and fly it to Sweden; once in...
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Anyone who has ever been entranced by Max's wild rumpus with the titular characters from Where the Wild Things Are , Mickey's dough-fueled flight out of In the Night Kitchen's pie, or any one of the number of indelible creations that sprang from the imagination of Maurice Sendak, will no doubt find the pages of their favorite books harder to...
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WHAM! BAM! POW? Put a SOCK in it, Arona Reiner gently states about the state of action comic books. She took action to do it her own way: At 71, the native Bostonian who long ago made Israel her home has changed the art of the deal. An accomplished and exhibited artist/sculptor, she has come out with her first comic...
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Throughout his life in politics, former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter often invoked the name of his Yiddish-speaking father, Harry, who left czarist Russia in 1911 for a better life in the United States. Sometimes, the younger Specter would highlight how his father had once owned a junkyard and did whatever he could to get his family through the Great Depression,...
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Peter Ephross, Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Nearly all fans of baseball history have heard of Hank Greenberg. Most have heard of Al Rosen. But fewer have heard of Cal Abrams, and hardly any, it's safe to say, have heard of Lou Limmer. All four are members of a compelling team -- the 165 American Jews who played Major League Baseball between the 1870s and the end...
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